I stand corrected. First, I did find a reference to Pixel Aspect Ratio (PAR) and down sampling uncompressed NTSC video in the joint Forensic Imaging and Multi-media Glossary (PDF) published by the IAI and LEVA, the final version of which was released in July, 2006. Second, in an effort to simplify this discussion, I’ve over simplified the Interpolation Methodology I described in Part 2. I will be expanding on that in this post, in far more detail than I had originally intended.

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Several other things I should be doing on a Saturday morning, but I find myself anxious to continue this discussion. Maybe it’s because although multiple industry Best Practice documents talk about correcting Aspect Ratio, none of them discuss the proper way to do it. It could also be my new coffee maker, which I'm hypothesizing has increased my caffeine intake substantially, although I have not increased my coffee intake. Who knows. Anyway, let’s start by recapping Part 1.

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Booked my travel yesterday for next month’s DVR Assessment & Video Recovery course at the Osceola County Sheriff’s Office in Kissimmee, FL. This 3-Day course is designed for anyone who is doing digital video evidence recovery from DCCTV systems, from those brand new to the field to Certified Forensic Video Analysts with several years of experience.

Snow on the ground again this morning here in the pacific northwest, and looking at the pictures for the hotel options in Orlando made me anxious. ;) Hope to see you in class!

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Let’s talk a little more about aspect ratio. Always a lively topic everywhere I go, and regularly misunderstood by industry leading CCTV equipment manufacturers, engineers, and other video professionals. Should we correct, when do we correct, how do we correct, and of course the why. I’ve done a few short posts on the topic in the past (here's one), but this will be in a little more detail. Still writing on the fly, just going to break it down into a few posts over time.

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Encryption is all the rage, again. Politicians and government officials apparently have no problem with using fear mongering to conjure up support for backdoors to encrypted devices and data. Privacy advocates keep doing the same, basically, warning that providing big brother with backdoor access to encrypted data is like leaving the cookie jar in your wide-open kitchen window, on Sesame Street.

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