Stumbled on a blog post today about this topic, which is worth the read IMHO - "Why I moved away from FOSS as my main toolset". The author, whom I first met when he was a student in a LEVA Level 1 and/or 2 class I was teaching the better part of 10 years ago, raises some valid points about leveraging FOSS in DME workflows; training, support and documenting FOSS tools being the points I agree with. To that end, keep your eyes & ears open for news about professional training & support for FOSS solutions related to DME.

With that said, I'm going to make a few comments and pose a few questions to the community based on the above post, so if you haven't read it...the rest of this post is probably moot.

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You don't need to own a Ring device, and no subscription fees for just their neighborhood service. See alerts from Ring users in whatever size area you'd like. View a newsfeed for your area or a map, and customize your alerts. Three suspicious events reported within a 3 mile radius from me within the last month, and one crime at a Ring user's next-door neighbor.

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Posted by Larry C. on behalf of James M. Kennedy.

The New York State Police Forensic Video/Multimedia Services Unit has approval to fill newly created positions in the Forensic DME Section and the Video Production Section of the Unit. Information on the first phase of hiring can be seen at the link below. Feel free to forward the link to anyone who you feel may have interest in the positions. Any questions and/or interest can be directed to myself using the contact information in the below email signature.

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Pirated software is not something most digital forensic examiners would consider as an option when processing case work, whether they’re certified in their area of expertise or just starting out in their discipline. That’s what I believe, anyway.

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Imagine the following scenario:
You're the first responding officer to a crime scene and have just completed taking the victim's statement. You then tell the victim you have to leave for another call. Before you go you politely ask the victim to take photos of the scene and their injuries, collect all of the DNA and fingerprint evidence, and note that you'll either be back later in the day or maybe tomorrow or the next day to pick it all up. You note that they can just leave the evidence at the front desk for you.

This is exactly how many agencies have chosen to deal with the overwhelming amount of DCCTV evidence available to them today. "Oh, there's video? Okay, have someone export it and we'll come back to pick it up."

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